Climate News and Information

ScienceDaily – The Latest Earth and Climate News

  • - PNW woodlands will be less vulnerable to drought, fire than Rocky Mountain, Sierra forestsForests in the Pacific Northwest will be less vulnerable to drought and fire over the next three decades than those in the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada, computer modeling shows.
  • - Half of the world's annual precipitation falls in just 12 daysCurrently, half of the world's measured precipitation that falls in a year falls in just 12 days, according to a new analysis of data collected at weather stations across the globe. By century's end, climate models project that this lopsided distribution of rain and snow is likely to become even more skewed, with half of annual precipitation falling in 11 days.
  • - Climate, life and the movement of continents: New connectionsA new study has demonstrated a possible link between life on Earth and the movement of continents. The findings show that sediment, which is often comprised from pieces of dead organisms, could play a key role in determining the speed of continental drift.
  • - Natural solutions can reduce global warmingA new study found that 21 percentof the United States' greenhouse gas pollution (1.2 Pg CO2e year) could be removed through enhanced management of forest, grassland, agricultural, and coastal areas. An offset at this level would be the equivalent to pollution from every single US car and truck on the road.
  • - Massive impact crater from a kilometer-wide iron meteorite discovered in GreenlandAn international team has discovered a 31-km wide meteorite impact crater buried beneath the ice-sheet in the northern Greenland. This is the first time that a crater of any size has been found under one of Earth's continental ice sheets.
  • - For arid, Mars-like Peruvian desert, rain brings deathWhen rains fell on the arid Atacama Desert, it was reasonable to expect floral blooms to follow. Instead, the water brought death. Planetary astrobiologists has found that after encountering never-before-seen rainfall three years ago at the arid core of Peru's Atacama Desert, the heavy precipitation wiped out most of the microbes that had lived there.